Preparing for college entrance exams

"My youngest son's SAT Math score went up 30 points after he worked with you for two weeks. My oldest son went to one of the other prep courses, received the same results, and he spent more of my money for the class. When I tell parents about your prices, they think it's too high, but they don't realize that they are going to have to pay later. Thanks for the newsletter. Darling, continue to do what you are doing for the community."


— M. Bourgeois, mother


Beginning January 2018: Reading & Writing for the SAT & ACT
36 on the ACT
Improving vocabulary
36 on the ACT? Yeah right
 SAT or ACT?  
   

Reading & Writing for the SAT & ACT
Enroll Your Student

Dates: January 2 - February 8
Meets: Tuesdays - Thursdays from 6:30  pm to 8:30 pm
Saturdays - January 6 and 27, February 3, from 9 am to 11 am, 15 sessions
Instructor: Jennifer Ledwith
Fee: $490 by December 29, 2017; $540 after December 29, 2017

Openings available.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Fee includes textbooks,. Register and pay by December 29, 2017 and save $50! After December 29, pay $540. Current and Former Scholar Ready students receive a 10% discount.

THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS
January 2, 6 pm to 6:30 pm - Parent and Student Meeting

Parents & Students will receive the course syllabus and learn about Ms. Jennifer's expectations.

THIS COURSE IS IDEAL FOR...

  • Students taking the February 2018 ACT.
  • Students taking the March 2018 SAT.
  • Students who want to focus on the Reading, Writing and Language, and English sections of the SAT & ACT.

WHAT WILL STUDENTS LEARN?

  • Grammar,  punctuation, and Standard American English
  • SAT-level vocabulary words
  • Pacing strategies
  • How to prepare for an exam
  • How to write an essay in 40 minutes (ACT) and an essay in 50 minutes (SAT)
  • How to answer passage-based questions strategically

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE COURSE

  • Class time includes 100% instruction. Students will take practice exams on January 13 and January 20 on their own.
  • Winter Challenge: Students complete quizzes and play games to win prizes.
  • Enroll Your Student

 
Q: Ms. Jennifer, I want to improve my vocabulary. How can I learn new words? — T.L., High School for Performing and Visual Arts

A: Because you probably enjoy using your creativity, go beyond the flashcards. Make a word quilt. Let's say that you would like to learn the word munificent, a word you read in a magazine article. Follow these steps to fully understand the word:

  1. Write munificent at the top of the page.
  2. Record the sentence that uses munificent.
  3. Using the dictionary, look up munificent, and write each of its meanings.
  4. Draw of picture of munificent.
  5. Use munificent in conversations with friends, family, and teachers.

36 on the ACT

Which do you prefer: a yawning road of boredom or a vibrant highway to success? I know that if you are a member of the Scholar Ready community, then you choose success.

Eventually, you or someone you love is going to sacrifice sleeping in on a Saturday morning (or afternoon, too) to take the SAT, ACT, or TSI. If you can read, then you have the power to transform a torpid experience into a treasure hunt. If you can read, then you have the power to answer all of the passage-based reading questions correctly.

I'm not the voice from a late night infomercial. This is for real. You can earn a perfect 36 on the Reading section of the ACT. Follow these steps, and you boost your Reading score of any standardized exam.

1. Memorize the vocabulary in Word Smart and Word Smart 2. One test-taker learned all of the definitions and attained a perfect score on the GRE.
2. Each reading passage is not for enjoyment: just read it. You know how your parents are always encouraging you to read more? Well, now is not the time to become that well-read person. Don't study the nuances of the writer's language. Don't even read it for complete comprehension. Don't reread any of the words. The passage's questions (all reading comprehension) will point to what the author wants you to understand.
3. Read the first question.
4. STOP!!! Cover up the answer choices. Most of them are distractions.
5. Return to the passage for the answer. Hunt for the answer in the text; the answer is always there. Make up your own response to the question.
6. Now, go to the answer choices. Find the choice that matches your response.
Q: My daughter is registered to take the SAT. Should she take the ACT too? Is there a difference between the tests?
Yes and yes. Your daughter may perform better on the ACT than the SAT. Some differences:
1) Extra Section: The SAT covers Critical Reading, Writing, and Math. Add a Science section, and you have the ACT.
2) Math: Expect straightforward Algebra, Algebra II, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus questions on the ACT. Study mostly Algebra I and II AND tricky test questions to do well on the SAT. 

Q: Ms. Jennifer, I'm taking the ACT in April, and I'm focusing on the Reading section. Your tips on the ACT are not realistic ("36 on the ACT"). I took a practice test, and I just don't see how it's possible for me to get a high score on the Reading section. For one thing, the passages are super boring and I ran out of time. How can I follow those steps if I'm worried about not finishing the exam? — Tired test-taker

Discipline is a bulwark against test anxiety. First, learn the words from the Word Smart books. Then, gather as many ACT prep books that you can buy or borrow. Pick a reading passage a slowly complete the following steps:

1. Read the passage.
2. Read the question.
3. STOP!!! Cover up the answer choices. Most of them are distractions.
4. Return to the passage for the answer. Hunt for the answer in the text; the answer is always there. Make up your own response to the question.
5. Now, go to the answer choices. Find the choice that matches your response.
Be sure to repeat steps 2 through 5 with each question.
Practice and practice until you can answer all 40 reading comprehension questions in 35 minutes.


Last modified: Thursday, 16 November 2017, 1:46 PM